R. Anthony Black Research Station Superintendent
Southeast Research and Education Center

Southeast Georgia Research and Education Center

9638 Highway 56 South, Midville, Georgia 30441

Contact us

Video Tour of the Center


2021 Field Day


Our Work and Priorities

The Southeast Research and Education Center is located in Burke County near Midville, Georgia, which is situated in between Augusta, Macon and Savannah. Established in 1951, the 720-acre facility is part of the upper coastal plain region just south of the fall line. The Tifton and Dothan series are the predominant soils and represent well-drained, sandy loam soils. The area receives about 44 inches of rainfall annually, making it one of the drier regions of the state. As a result, many research projects focus on the efficient use of water.

Current research by UGA scientists and Extension agents focuses on row crops and includes cotton, peanuts, corn, soybeans, and small grains. Roughly 40 research projects are conducted annually. These include the evaluation of crop varieties, pest management strategies, and conservation tillage practices including cover crop systems. Most experiments are irrigated with center pivot systems. In addition, a 6-acre site is devoted to sub-surface drip irrigation.

The center hosts several outreach functions throughout the year, some in collaboration with Burke County Extension. An annual field day is held every August along with several smaller production meetings, training and workshops. Local school groups conduct field trips and Ag Awareness education at the center as well.

About us


We investigate the latest production and technological practices, striving for producer profitability and sustainability.
Research and Education Centers (RECs) are hubs for innovation and discovery that address the most critical issues facing agricultural production throughout the state. Ultimately, our findings are shared with stakeholders through the extension and outreach efforts of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Entomosporium leaf spot on Photinia (Red Tip). Small reddish leaf spots appear initially. As spots age, center is grayish with a dark purple border. Leaf spots may coalesce causing severe leaf blight. Severely infected leaves drop prematurely. Over time severely infected plants die. Infection is favored by poor air circulation and prolonged periods of leaf wetness. CAES News
Rainy weather brings leaf spot disease
Excessive rain signals another a bad year for leaf spot diseases on landscape trees and shrubs. The leaf spotting that affects pear trees, including both edible pears and ornamental Bradford types, is caused by a fungal disease known as Entomosporium leaf spot. This disease also affects related shrubs such as Indian hawthorn and red tip photinia.
Researchers in the US and Senegal are studying why young people leave peanut farming behind and move to the city, an important question for the future of farming in Senegal’s Groundnut Basin. University of Georgia PhD student Pierre Diatta and Virginia Tech’s Brad Mills (far left and left), will present early findings of the study, along with UGA agricultural economist Genti Kostandini (far right), in a webinar next week. The team is working with Katim Toure, a collaborator at ENSA (École Nationale Supérieure d'Agriculture) in Senegal. CAES News
Ag economists offer webinar on why young people leave the farm in Senegal
All over the world, farmers are aging and young people are moving to more urban areas for economic opportunities. Leaders wonder what factors push young people to abandon agriculture and whether technology or other tools can make farming a more attractive option for the next generation. Next week, researchers from the University of Georgia and Virginia Tech will present early findings from research exploring those questions in Senegal, where a team surveyed more than 1,000 peanut-growing households to explore challenges among peanut producers and learn the main reasons why young people turn away from agriculture.