Midville Field Day

Please join us Wednesday, August 10 at the Southeast Georgia Research and Education Center for the Midville Row Crop Field Day. Event will begin at 9:00 a.m. with tours and presentations of field research plots. A sponsored lunch will be provided.

Topics include variety evaluations, wildlife field border management, cover crop management, fertility management, creating pollinator habitats, precision ag research. and variable rate liming for forage production.

CCA Credits and Category 10/21 Pesticide Credits offered.

Flyer for Midvile Row Crop Field Day
R. Anthony Black Research Station Superintendent
Southeast Research and Education Center

Southeast Georgia Research and Education Center

9638 Highway 56 South, Midville, Georgia 30441

Contact us

Video Tour of the Center


2021 Field Day


Our Work and Priorities

The Southeast Research and Education Center is located in Burke County near Midville, Georgia, which is situated in between Augusta, Macon and Savannah. Established in 1951, the 720-acre facility is part of the upper coastal plain region just south of the fall line. The Tifton and Dothan series are the predominant soils and represent well-drained, sandy loam soils. The area receives about 44 inches of rainfall annually, making it one of the drier regions of the state. As a result, many research projects focus on the efficient use of water.

Current research by UGA scientists and Extension agents focuses on row crops and includes cotton, peanuts, corn, soybeans, and small grains. Roughly 40 research projects are conducted annually. These include the evaluation of crop varieties, pest management strategies, and conservation tillage practices including cover crop systems. Most experiments are irrigated with center pivot systems. In addition, a 6-acre site is devoted to sub-surface drip irrigation.

The center hosts several outreach functions throughout the year, some in collaboration with Burke County Extension. An annual field day is held every August along with several smaller production meetings, training and workshops. Local school groups conduct field trips and Ag Awareness education at the center as well.

About us


We investigate the latest production and technological practices, striving for producer profitability and sustainability.
Research and Education Centers (RECs) are hubs for innovation and discovery that address the most critical issues facing agricultural production throughout the state. Ultimately, our findings are shared with stakeholders through the extension and outreach efforts of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Newly purchased sensors will allow growers to monitor fertilizer movements in their soil over time and adjust irrigation and other production practices to minimize fertilizer loss through leaching. CAES News
UGA Extension helps farmers improve efficiency, save 100 million gallons of water
Over the last few decades, water use-related disagreements between Georgia and its surrounding states have held the spotlight in the Southeast. To address the need for conservation, the Agricultural Water Efficiency Team (AgWET) was created to train University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents to transfer advanced irrigation scheduling knowledge to growers through a unique one-on-one educational approach.
While blueberries are known to be susceptible to postharvest injuries, resulting in fruit softening or splitting during harvest, handling and storage, UGA researchers are trying to figure out why some crops experience greater losses. CAES News
CAES researchers examine blueberry quality issues for Georgia producers
A multidisciplinary team of University of Georgia agriculture experts are working to determine causes and solutions to postharvest quality problems that have hit Georgia’s blueberry growers hard in recent seasons. Funded by the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Office of Research and UGA Cooperative Extension, the project will address “major issues” with fruit quality, particularly in rabbiteye blueberries.

CAES Events

Please join us on February 8th for the 12th annual Northeast Georgia Beef Cattle Short Course in Athens, GA! We will have vendors and representatives from several companies and institutions to visit with during the breaks and lunch. Participants this year will receive continuing education hours for Beef Quality Assurance (3 hours). This year’s short course we be held in conjunction with the Focus on Genetically Enhanced EPDs Bull Sale.  The sale will be held on February 9th, but all bulls and heifers will be onsite during the short course.  Please visit our Focus on EPDs Bull Sale page for the catalog and more information on the sale. If you have any questions about the program, please contact your local Extension office (1-800-ASK-UGA1).  
Feb 08
8:00AM - 4:30PM Northeast Georgia Beef Cattle Short Course UGA Livestock Instructional Arena, Athens, GA
UGA Center for Food Safety Webinar Series       Microbial Ecology and Evolution: Insights into Food Safety and Public Health Guest speaker: Dr. Jingqiu Liao, Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech Date: Thursday, Feb 23 Time: 11 a.m. ET Location: Melton Building Conference Room or Zoom: https://zoom.us/j/98501538123?pwd=d2F6TW1oVVhnUjZwUDdCVmpoWTVwQT09   Hosted by Dr. Xiangyu Deng, Associate Professor Abstract: Our environment sustains enormous microbes, including foodborne pathogens. Understanding their ecology and evolution in the context of the environment can inform the assessment of the risk of foodborne pathogen transmission and the development of tools for the investigation and control of foodborne outbreaks. Despite the importance, we lack proper translation of the mechanistic knowledge of the ecology and evolution of foodborne pathogens into the food safety and public health area. In this talk, I will discuss how we use a microbial ecology and evolution framework to address food safety concerns caused by three bacterial taxa – Listeria, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli. Specifically, I will talk about our large-scale environmental surveillance of Listeria across the entire US and its potential transmission to food-associated environments, genetic markers that may be used for source-tracking antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella, and the influence of watershed landscape on the transmission of E. coli to agricultural soils. Dr. Jingqiu Liao is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech. Dr. Liao received her Ph.D. in Microbiology from Cornell University and was an exchange Ph.D. student at MIT, studying the ecology and evolution of foodborne and environmental-transmitted pathogens. She subsequently trained as a Postdoctoral Researcher at Columbia University Irving Medical Center where she investigated the role of microbiomes in human health. Dr. Liao’s work has been published in more than 30 scientific articles in journals such as Nature Microbiology, Science, Environmental Microbiology, and Applied and Environmental Microbiology. The Liao Environmental and Public Health Microbiology Lab (LEAPH) that Dr. Liao is leading at Virginia Tech investigate how microbiomes, foodborne pathogens, and antimicrobial-resistant microbes interact with natural and food-associated environments. The LEAPH aims to advance a mechanistic and predictive understanding of microbial diversity and ecosystem functioning and to deliver actionable solutions to help improve sustainability, food safety, and public health.  
Feb 23
11:00AM - 12:00PM Microbial Ecology and Evolution: Insights into Food Safety and Public Health Melton Building, GRIFFIN, GA
See More Events