Statewide Variety Testing

The UGA CAES Statewide Variety Testing program provides annual performance testing results on Georgia commodities including canola, small grains and forage, corn and silage and field crops.

Visit the website

Local Weather Network

The Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network collects reliable weather information for agricultural and environmental applications. Each station monitors air temperature, relative humidity, rainfall, solar radiation, wind speed and direction, soil temperature and moisture and atmospheric pressure.

View local weather

Highlighted Field Day Videos


2021 Field Day  


2020 Virtual Midville Field Day Recording


UGA Extension Publications
White Clover Establishment and Management Guide
(B 1251)
White clover (Trifolium repens L.) is a cool season perennial legume of Mediterranean origin. White clover has been used as a forage in North America since Colonial times. Benjamin Franklin noted its prevalence in cleared and disturbed land as early as 1746. There are many animal and agronomic related reasons for establishing a productive stand of white clover in existing grass pastures. This publication covers tips on selecting, establishing and managing white clover to help ensure a productive stand.
Common Terms Used in Animal Feeding and Nutrition
(B 1367)
The purpose of this publication is to serve as an educational reference and resource to those who are interested in animal feeding and nutrition. Our primary objective is to list the common terms used when discussing animal feeding. This listing will also be helpful when reading articles on animal feeding and nutrition, feed analysis reports or tags associated with feeds sold in the market.
The Management and Use of Bahiagrass
(B 1362)
Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge) is a long-lived, perennial warm season grass that is grown extensively in the southeastern United States. It is most commonly used as a pasture species, but can be used for hay production, erosion control, and wildlife habitat. Bahiagrass can also be used in "sod-based rotation" sequences that have been found to suppress pest problems (nematode and disease issues) in crops such as peanuts.
Georgia Forages: Grass Species
(B 1351)
The geographic and environmental diversity of Georgia allows for the extensive use of both cool and warm season grass species. In general, cool season grass species provide higher nutritional quality than warm season grasses. In contrast, warm season grasses generally yield more than cool season grasses. Each type and species, however, offers its own unique qualities and benefits to the forage system. In this section, the most important grass species in Georgia are introduced and discussed.
Pearl Millet for Grain
(B 1216)
Pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum [L.] R. Br.) has a long history of use as a summer grazing and hay crop in the southeastern U.S. The recent development of new, adaptable and productive grain pearl millet hybrids in the Southeast gives crop producers a suitable alternative feed grain for dryland production.
Bermudagrass in Georgia
(B 911)
Bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.) is an important warm-season, perennial, sod-forming forage grass in Georgia and throughout the Southeast. Bermudagrass is productive from spring until fall and is well-suited for grazing or hay production. Several varieties of bermudagrass are used in Georgia, ranging from common bermudagrass to the high-yielding, good quality hybrid bermudagrasses. The best variety to use depends on your location in the state and the intended use.
See More Publications